canadican:

rider-waite:

lauramain-sherlolly:

dudeufugly:

wivalamine:

shahlalalalala:

earthlyscum:

can someone bring capes back into fashion

when the fuck did they even go out of fashion

Why the fuck did they even go out of fashion

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The first time the Incredibles took over a post and I am so happy about it

reminder that stratogale was in high school when she got sucked into the airplane propeller and died

do you ever just think edna sat in the back of the funeral in the little hometown church
the sound of sniffling and crying surrounding her
wearing a floor-length black dress and a black veil to hide her puffy eyes as she takes out her sketchbook and starts ripping all her design ideas for costumes out
whispering “no capes. no capes. no capes.” over and over, knowing that it was her fault a high school student died a horrific, painful death to the point where they can’t have a body to bury

WHAT

WHY WOULD YOU

WHY WOULD YOU

WHY

Source: xchaospixiex



nanodash:

psychonauticthought:

nanodash:

This is an image of Tourmaline, photographed from two different angles with polarised light.
Tourmaline is Pleochromic, meaning it changes colour as the angle changes. This isn’t a surface effect like the changing rainbow colours on an oil slick, it happens throughout the crystal.
The crystal structure in Tourmaline is anisotropic, which means it looks different from different directions. That means light coming in from different directions experience different effects and can get absorbed in different amounts, leading to something very cool.
It also happens with other crystals, like this Cordierite


There needs to be a video of this!

Here’s a gif. I like gifs. This is Iolite, the gem version of Cordierite, changing colour as the angle changes. Pretty. If you absolutely need a video though, here’s the source

nanodash:

psychonauticthought:

nanodash:

This is an image of Tourmaline, photographed from two different angles with polarised light.

Tourmaline is Pleochromic, meaning it changes colour as the angle changes. This isn’t a surface effect like the changing rainbow colours on an oil slick, it happens throughout the crystal.

The crystal structure in Tourmaline is anisotropic, which means it looks different from different directions. That means light coming in from different directions experience different effects and can get absorbed in different amounts, leading to something very cool.

It also happens with other crystals, like this Cordierite

There needs to be a video of this!

Here’s a gif. I like gifs. This is Iolite, the gem version of Cordierite, changing colour as the angle changes. Pretty. If you absolutely need a video though, here’s the source

image

Source: nanodash



mindblowingscience:

Tire makers race to turn dandelions into rubber

Dutch biologist Ingrid van der Meer often meets with disbelief when she talks about her work on dandelions and how it could secure the future of road transport.
The reaction is understandable, given most people regard the yellow flowers as pesky intruders in their gardens rather than a promising source of rubber for tires.
"People just think of it as a horrible weed and ask how can you get enough material for tires from just a small root," she said.
Her research team is competing with others across the world to breed a type of dandelion native to Kazakhstan whose taproot yields a milky fluid with tire-grade rubber particles in it.
Global tire makers such as industry leader Bridgestone Corp (5108.T) and No.4 player Continental AG (CONG.DE) believe they are in for rich pickings and are backing such research to the tune of millions of dollars.
Early signs are good. A small-scale trial by a U.S. research team found the dandelions delivered per-hectare rubber yields on a par with the best rubber-tree plantations in tropical Asia.
So within a decade, rather than being a backyard bane like their wild cousins, the new flowers might be seen in neat rows in hundreds of thousands of acres across Europe and the United States, where they can grow even in poor soil.
And they could have some interesting modifications. For instance, German researchers have bred the plants to grow to up to a foot (30 cm) in height, dwarfing many of their backyard cousins. They are also developing the dandelions with upright rather than flat-growing leaves - just so harvesting machines have something to grab on to.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Tire makers race to turn dandelions into rubber

Dutch biologist Ingrid van der Meer often meets with disbelief when she talks about her work on dandelions and how it could secure the future of road transport.

The reaction is understandable, given most people regard the yellow flowers as pesky intruders in their gardens rather than a promising source of rubber for tires.

"People just think of it as a horrible weed and ask how can you get enough material for tires from just a small root," she said.

Her research team is competing with others across the world to breed a type of dandelion native to Kazakhstan whose taproot yields a milky fluid with tire-grade rubber particles in it.

Global tire makers such as industry leader Bridgestone Corp (5108.T) and No.4 player Continental AG (CONG.DE) believe they are in for rich pickings and are backing such research to the tune of millions of dollars.

Early signs are good. A small-scale trial by a U.S. research team found the dandelions delivered per-hectare rubber yields on a par with the best rubber-tree plantations in tropical Asia.

So within a decade, rather than being a backyard bane like their wild cousins, the new flowers might be seen in neat rows in hundreds of thousands of acres across Europe and the United States, where they can grow even in poor soil.

And they could have some interesting modifications. For instance, German researchers have bred the plants to grow to up to a foot (30 cm) in height, dwarfing many of their backyard cousins. They are also developing the dandelions with upright rather than flat-growing leaves - just so harvesting machines have something to grab on to.

Continue Reading.

Source: reuters.com




“Long distance relationships have their own sense of beauty. That someone can wait days, months, or even years for someone they love who are miles or oceans away. That someone can fall deeply in love with someone and love all the moments that are shared. It doesn’t matter if someone is miles or oceans away; being loved by someone’s fullest is something so beautiful and raw.”

Linda Nguyen | Moments are all we need (via unfoldvibrantly)

Source: unfoldvibrantly




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